Yannis Varoufakis: The Greek economy is finished …. This is our Great Depression


Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Broadcast: 18/06/2012

Reporter: Leigh Sales

With a pro-bailout and pro-austerity party claiming victory in the Greek election, economist Yanis Varoufakis joins us from Athens to reflect on what the result means for the economy and the Eurozone.

Transcript

LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: Joining us now from Athens is the Greek economist Yanis Varoufakis.

The obvious question is: what happens now?

YANIS VAROUFAKIS, ECONOMICS, ATHENS UNIVERSITY: Well, the derailment of the train that is the eurozone, which started with Greece and then other carriages started leaving the tracks sequentially – Ireland, Portugal, now Spain – is continuing. And yesterday’s vote is not going to change that at all. All exuberance and celebrations are completely and utterly misplaced. I’m afraid that the eurozone and Συνέχεια

Support for Greece’s mentally ill disintegrates as money dries up


Greece financial crisis: A homeless man begs for money in Athens in February.
Kostas Tsironis/AP

MySatelite comment: It makes one wonder how an article like this appears now, at precisely this time of year, when many are planning their summer vacation, after people around the world donated money in support of the «Up Greek Tourism» project in March that set up a billboard in NY’s Times Square to promote one of Greece’s most viable means of sustenance.

After a continued effort by the foreign media to denigrate Greece’s public sector in order to regulate its Συνέχεια

The suicide note and post scriptum of the living


I fear. I fear because you have no idea how angry we are and our anger has no outlet when police forces attack you as you reverently place a flower on the grass where the body of the 77-year-old pensioner who took his own life lay yesterday in Syntagma Square, just meters away from Greek Parliament.

His death was not the first. There have been many more these past two years, but the media always played these cases down with a peremptory «mentally imbalanced» name tag on each victim’s toe — if they happened to mention the incident at all, that is. Yesterday they couldn’t hide it. It was early in the morning and there were many passers-by; it was outside the parliamentary building; it was in the center of Syntagma, the square all eyes have turned to ever since this maelstrom started three years ago, where all protesters have gathered and been clubbed by batons every single time because they want to exercise their democratic right to voice their feelings.

The late victim’s name was Dimitris Christoulas. He was a pharmacist. People who knew him said the Συνέχεια

The videos of Greece you won’t see


The news won’t mention much other than how Athens burned last night. The news never mentions how millions took to the streets yesterday all over Greece to demand elections, to ask for a referendum, to quit the Euro, to revert back to the drachma. The news never shows what really happens, but chooses to show what it has been told to show.

Well, these are the videos you won’t see on your TV set. Please let everyone know that Greeks aren’t dumb, they see who the measures are for and know that the people implementing them are no longer Συνέχεια

A dose of optimism


Greek designers send message of hope

+ DESIGN in collaboration with Paper Perrakis has invited Greek designers to submit poster designs to put a smile on Greek faces everywhere. An exhibition in Athens this coming January will showcase and sell these artworks. All proceeds will go to charity.

We can all use some positive energy – and images – to get through tough times. Enjoy a sampling of submitted posters below…


antonisgiannopoulos-731x1024
Συνέχεια

A Modest Proposal


By Stephen Fry
December 19th, 2011

Greece is the Word

I have a modest proposal that might simultaneously celebrate the life of Christopher Hitchens, strengthen Britain’s low stock in Europe and allow us to help a dear friend in terrible trouble.

Perhaps the most beautiful and famous monument in the world is the Doric masterpiece atop the citadel, or Acropolis, of Athens. It is called the Parthenon, the Virgin Temple dedicated to Pallas Athene, the goddess of wisdom who gave the Greek capital its name.

 

Parthenon – west side © A Sampson 2009 Συνέχεια