Greek Filmmaker Kollatos Arrested


Greek filmmaker Dimitris Kollatos was arrested, on March 27 at his house in Kolonaki, Athens on the charge of insulting the national emblem.

Kollatos raised on the balcony of his house, which is situated almost opposite the German Embassy, a Greek flag on which the Συνέχεια

Crush the Crisis – Visit Greece


A wonderful video. Thank you Annette for a job well done!

Hats off to you,

MySatelite Συνέχεια

Ambassador Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos on the Greek economic crisis: could this Greek Tragedy lead to civil war?


Published on December 17th 2012

By Barbara Van Haute

Editorial Note:  Of all the nations experiencing traumatic economic difficulties during the course of the current Great Recession, Greece has suffered the most adverse consequences.  The country’s five year economic problems have been longer and deeper than that of any developed country.  In fact, Greece has gone through a catastrophic depression otherwise unknown in the West.

The  standard of living has dropped drastically; unemployment has reached 26%; the debt to GDP ratio  is over 180%; the country’s “fiscal cliff” is looming bankruptcy;  social spending and the “safety net” have been eviscerated; while demonstrations and riots target both domestic debt reduction measures and the financial institutions  of the European Union power brokers. In response, the European Union Συνέχεια

Media Dictatorship in Greece


 

Al Jazeera’s feature on the Greek media in the video that follows, underlines the truth many have known in Greece for several years now. The fact that graffiti on walls says «switch off the TV» goes to show that Greeks no longer view news bulletins and journalists as objective.

The picture above was snapped during last year’s demonstrations at the end of May in Thessaloniki. It was one of many messages taped on columns outside the city’s symbol of pain and freedom, the White Tower, which translates to: «If TV said it, it’s probably a lie.»

Though links between political parties and the media have been common knowledge to Greeks, far too Συνέχεια

Meet the Greek Leader Who Sent Global Markets Reeling


The man behind much of Tuesday’s market selloff is a 37-year-old Greek named Alexi Tsipras, the leader of the Coalition for the Radical Left.

Alexis Tsipras

Louisa Gouliamaki | AFP | Getty Images

Left Coalition Party Leader, Alexis Tsipras


When handed the right to try and form a coalition government in Greece, he told the world that the Greek bailout agreement is “null and void” and should be abandoned.

This sent global markets reeling because he could potentially unleash a series of events that would force Greece to leave the euro zone.

Besides abandoning the bailout, Tsipras said he’d like to nationalize the banks permanently, restore all salaries and pensions to their previous higher levels and bring back collective bargaining rights. Συνέχεια

The «I am Hellene» video just doesn’t cut it


We all suddenly remembered we’re Greek, no sorry, Hellene.

You try and try to stay positive, give words of encouragement instead of criticism to what your countrymen do, but videos like this just don’t let you, do they?

Ok, the video was an attempt at promoting all the values that make Greece what it is, denounced foreign disdain for the way we Greeks view life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness and especially stressed the way Hellenism underlies every important current in Western History. So why, then, did watching this video leave a taste of disgust in my mouth? Συνέχεια

The suicide note and post scriptum of the living


I fear. I fear because you have no idea how angry we are and our anger has no outlet when police forces attack you as you reverently place a flower on the grass where the body of the 77-year-old pensioner who took his own life lay yesterday in Syntagma Square, just meters away from Greek Parliament.

His death was not the first. There have been many more these past two years, but the media always played these cases down with a peremptory «mentally imbalanced» name tag on each victim’s toe — if they happened to mention the incident at all, that is. Yesterday they couldn’t hide it. It was early in the morning and there were many passers-by; it was outside the parliamentary building; it was in the center of Syntagma, the square all eyes have turned to ever since this maelstrom started three years ago, where all protesters have gathered and been clubbed by batons every single time because they want to exercise their democratic right to voice their feelings.

The late victim’s name was Dimitris Christoulas. He was a pharmacist. People who knew him said the Συνέχεια

Aerial Viewing of Greece (video)


We posted an article five days ago here on MySatelite with one of the most beautiful videos of Greece and thought it a pity if a short comment in English were not added to make this splendid video available to English-speakers as well.

Despite propaganda emanating from Wall Street, the ECB, IMF and various other consortia which have been banking all along on this financial crisis like a roulette addict on 18 red, Greece has much to offer, though its politicians are bent on selling off its most prized assets — its land and natural resources — at ridiculously cheap prices, which has been in our view one of the prime reasons for the instigation of this crisis in the first place.

This video was made to remind us in Greece of the beauties of the blessed country we live in: its seas, Συνέχεια

Order out of Chaos


Out of the wreckage, international bankers will rise as saviors. The bubble that will inevitably burst in Europe was engineered by a group, a clique, of private bankers in key positions.

Raising awareness is key, but not enough to change the situation. Governments have already armed themselves with an anti-riot arsenal worthy of any extravagant blockbuster action film, while the media has taken on the role of feeding propaganda to citizens.

Watch the video and spread the knowledge. Συνέχεια

Our friends from Goldman Sachs…


PE Sanchez

Mario Monti, Lucas Papademos and Mario Draghi have something in common: they have all worked for the American investment bank. This is not a coincidence, but evidence of a strategy to exert influence that has perhaps already reached its limits.

Marc Roche

Serious and competent, they weigh up the pros and cons and study all of the documents before giving an opinion. They have a fondness for economics, but these luminaries who enter into the temple only after a long and meticulous recruitment process prefer to remain discreet.

Collectively they form an entity that is part pressure group, part fraternal association for the collection of information, and part mutual aid network. They are the craftsmen, masters and grandmasters whose mission is «to spread the truth acquired in the lodge to the rest of the world.»

According to its detractors, the European network of influence woven by American bank Goldman Sachs (GS) functions like a freemasonry. To diverse degrees, the new European Central Bank President, Mario Draghi, the newly designated Prime Minister of Italy, Mario Monti, and the freshly appointed Greek Prime Minister Lucas Papademos are totemic figures in this carefully constructed web. Συνέχεια

Let Them Eat π


Yet another excellent article from Sturdyblog that steers away from the usual propagandist ranting of the media that is simply a tool in the hands of speculative bankers and other investor think tanks geared towards shaping public opinion to suit their needs.

The only regret I have when reading this gem is that punches were pulled. Papademos and Monti need to be seen as usurpers of democracy and their respective rise to power called coups d’état, plain and simple. Most important of all is the fact that people in Greece believe their country’s rising debt is not just 30-years’ worth of bad politics, corruption and inept members of Parliament — it’s been a methodical, calculated plan executed with preciseness, enabling the few to live off the many.

My firm belief is that this has been in the making for a long time. Greece practically hasn’t had a single patriot in office since WWII. Foreign interests influenced and still influence decisions to benefit everyone but us Greeks. Some saw the world as an orange, squeezing (half of it) as much as they could out of Third World countries — sorry, that would be developing countries to those who want politically correct euphemisms used to spice up slavery as an on-going evolutionary process towards development. Now that the orange is starting to shrivel, they’ve decided to pick up the other half by turning to Europe and as I foresee other developed countries and squeeze out the savings it managed to accumulate throughout the years.

Enjoy the read, and many thanks to the author for a very fine piece.

The Reaper

Let Them Eat π

Some months ago I tried to explain that the crisis in Greece concerned the entire globe directly and that what was happening to my country was nothing short of an economic coup d’état. Naturally, I was accused of doom-mongering and over-dramatising. It pains me to have been proven absolutely right on Συνέχεια

The Death of Democracy and National Sovereignty in Europe


As Johan Van Overtveldt, the editor-in-chef of Trends magazine states, Greece is «condemned to go down in a vicious circle of more recession, more unemployment, larger government deficits or budget deficits and so an endless need of additional money to fill up the gaps.»

So why continue the loans? Why continue the Euro sham? Since Italy is next, and France’s banking system will follow suit, why fix something that already smells putrid?

Brussels will undoubtedly push the situation to its advantage and demand to step in at any time. Συνέχεια

Contagion: Europe on The Brink as Debt Crisis Spreads To Spain


Like a Phoenix from its Ashes


Yesterday’s scene in front of Parliament sums it all up. The old clashes with the new as the country is in flames.

Συνέχεια

The myth of the “lazy Greek workers”


Since the crisis in Greece has hit the headlines there have appeared in the bourgeois media many stories about how Greece has too many civil servants, how the working week is very short, how people retire early on fat pensions, and so on, as if this were the cause of the crisis. Facts and figures, however, can be very stubborn things and they tell a completely different story.

During the last few days we have witnessed an unprecedented smear campaign against the Greek working class by the European bourgeois media, in particular by the tabloid press, which is specifically aimed at working class people. This campaign is aimed at deceiving the European workers and its objective is clearly to prevent them from assuming internationalist action of class solidarity towards the working class of Greece, which is being brutally attacked by both Greek and foreign capitalists.

The first myth being promoted in this campaign goes more or less like this: “these lazy Greek people, Συνέχεια

A miserable failure of the IMF prescription


THE FIGURES disclosed by the Hellenic Statistical Authority last month show the complete failure of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) prescription for Greece, resulting in a rapid increase in inflation, but also a reduction in the revenues.

So, annual inflation in July rose to 5.5 percent from 5.2 percent in June 2010 and 0.6 percent in July 2009, now returning to 1997 levels! In addition, state revenues in July decreased by 10 percent overall and Value-Added Tax (VAT) returns by 5 percent, despite the fact that all indirect taxes have increased.

It has now become evident to the government and the IMF Συνέχεια

Greek Austerity: One Toilet Paper per Neighborhood…


Greek Austerity: One Toilet Paper per Neighborhood…

“One salaried per family, one book per class, one policeman per protester, one political lie per minute, one doctor per hospital, one austerity measure per day. Who said the state is not organized?” That’s a Facebook status quotation posted by a Greek. It describes very well the Συνέχεια

Student Unrest in Greece


It seems that students in public schools and universities will have another difficult year ahead of them. The article that follows sets out the facts as strikes, demonstrations and students taking over faculties and schools will fill disgruntled youths’ agenda.

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At least 45 university departments occupied by their students in Greece, gearing up for another winter of discontent. Συνέχεια

Greek economic crisis: Timeless values help villagers


Roger Jinkinson, a British writer who lives in a remote village on the Greek island of Karpathos, reflects on how the profound economic crisis is affecting his small rural community more than 400km from Athens.

Although times are hard, he believes that a long tradition of thriftiness, a thriving barter economy and the return of young people to work on the land will help the village weather the crisis.

The older generation in the village are thrifty and hard working; they are used to a frugal existence and times of extreme hardship.

Hundreds of thousands of Greeks died of starvation and the complications of severe malnutrition during World War Two and the Civil War that followed.

Memories of those times can be seen etched in the faces of the old Συνέχεια

THE ANSWER (To Whom Do We Owe This Money, Exactly?)


Children have a terrifically simple way of exploring the limits of adult knowledge. They do so by asking a question, then responding to each new piece of data with “but, why?”. The almost inevitable ending to this line of questioning is either “because I said so” or “I don’t know, that’s just how it is”.

I seem to have a elicited a similar response when, on Friday, I posted the blog To Whom Do We Owe This Money, Exactly?Since then, that post has been read by 20,000 people on the blog (and many thousands more via a circulating viral email). I have received many hundreds of responses whether by direct comment, email, Facebook or Twitter. The blog has been re-tweeted 1,000 times and shared on Facebook 1,200 times – before being flagged as abusive! The responses almost universally accept that the research is accurate.

The answer is: we owe this money, primarily, to the financial sector we went into debt to bail out. Συνέχεια