Greek Filmmaker Kollatos Arrested


Greek filmmaker Dimitris Kollatos was arrested, on March 27 at his house in Kolonaki, Athens on the charge of insulting the national emblem.

Kollatos raised on the balcony of his house, which is situated almost opposite the German Embassy, a Greek flag on which the Συνέχεια

Crush the Crisis – Visit Greece


A wonderful video. Thank you Annette for a job well done!

Hats off to you,

MySatelite Συνέχεια

Ambassador Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos on the Greek economic crisis: could this Greek Tragedy lead to civil war?


Published on December 17th 2012

By Barbara Van Haute

Editorial Note:  Of all the nations experiencing traumatic economic difficulties during the course of the current Great Recession, Greece has suffered the most adverse consequences.  The country’s five year economic problems have been longer and deeper than that of any developed country.  In fact, Greece has gone through a catastrophic depression otherwise unknown in the West.

The  standard of living has dropped drastically; unemployment has reached 26%; the debt to GDP ratio  is over 180%; the country’s “fiscal cliff” is looming bankruptcy;  social spending and the “safety net” have been eviscerated; while demonstrations and riots target both domestic debt reduction measures and the financial institutions  of the European Union power brokers. In response, the European Union Συνέχεια

Media Dictatorship in Greece


 

Al Jazeera’s feature on the Greek media in the video that follows, underlines the truth many have known in Greece for several years now. The fact that graffiti on walls says «switch off the TV» goes to show that Greeks no longer view news bulletins and journalists as objective.

The picture above was snapped during last year’s demonstrations at the end of May in Thessaloniki. It was one of many messages taped on columns outside the city’s symbol of pain and freedom, the White Tower, which translates to: «If TV said it, it’s probably a lie.»

Though links between political parties and the media have been common knowledge to Greeks, far too Συνέχεια

Meet the Greek Leader Who Sent Global Markets Reeling


The man behind much of Tuesday’s market selloff is a 37-year-old Greek named Alexi Tsipras, the leader of the Coalition for the Radical Left.

Alexis Tsipras

Louisa Gouliamaki | AFP | Getty Images

Left Coalition Party Leader, Alexis Tsipras


When handed the right to try and form a coalition government in Greece, he told the world that the Greek bailout agreement is “null and void” and should be abandoned.

This sent global markets reeling because he could potentially unleash a series of events that would force Greece to leave the euro zone.

Besides abandoning the bailout, Tsipras said he’d like to nationalize the banks permanently, restore all salaries and pensions to their previous higher levels and bring back collective bargaining rights. Συνέχεια

The «I am Hellene» video just doesn’t cut it


We all suddenly remembered we’re Greek, no sorry, Hellene.

You try and try to stay positive, give words of encouragement instead of criticism to what your countrymen do, but videos like this just don’t let you, do they?

Ok, the video was an attempt at promoting all the values that make Greece what it is, denounced foreign disdain for the way we Greeks view life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness and especially stressed the way Hellenism underlies every important current in Western History. So why, then, did watching this video leave a taste of disgust in my mouth? Συνέχεια

The suicide note and post scriptum of the living


I fear. I fear because you have no idea how angry we are and our anger has no outlet when police forces attack you as you reverently place a flower on the grass where the body of the 77-year-old pensioner who took his own life lay yesterday in Syntagma Square, just meters away from Greek Parliament.

His death was not the first. There have been many more these past two years, but the media always played these cases down with a peremptory «mentally imbalanced» name tag on each victim’s toe — if they happened to mention the incident at all, that is. Yesterday they couldn’t hide it. It was early in the morning and there were many passers-by; it was outside the parliamentary building; it was in the center of Syntagma, the square all eyes have turned to ever since this maelstrom started three years ago, where all protesters have gathered and been clubbed by batons every single time because they want to exercise their democratic right to voice their feelings.

The late victim’s name was Dimitris Christoulas. He was a pharmacist. People who knew him said the Συνέχεια