Ambassador Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos on the Greek economic crisis: could this Greek Tragedy lead to civil war?


Published on December 17th 2012

By Barbara Van Haute

Editorial Note:  Of all the nations experiencing traumatic economic difficulties during the course of the current Great Recession, Greece has suffered the most adverse consequences.  The country’s five year economic problems have been longer and deeper than that of any developed country.  In fact, Greece has gone through a catastrophic depression otherwise unknown in the West.

The  standard of living has dropped drastically; unemployment has reached 26%; the debt to GDP ratio  is over 180%; the country’s “fiscal cliff” is looming bankruptcy;  social spending and the “safety net” have been eviscerated; while demonstrations and riots target both domestic debt reduction measures and the financial institutions  of the European Union power brokers. In response, the European Union Συνέχεια

Hard at Work at the European Parliament in Brussels


 HARD AT WORK AT THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT IN BRUSSELS

Irish referendum: record low turnout reported (Τα αποτελέσματα του δημοψηφίσματος στην Ιρλανδία αναμένεται αύριο)


MySatelite: Χαμηλή η προσέλευση στις κάλπες, δεν έγιναν exit poll, οι αναλυτές εκτιμούν πως η αποχή θα ευνοήσει τα ποσοστά όσων είναι κατά της επικύρωσης του Δημοσιονομικού Συμφώνου.

(Το δημοσιονομικό σύμφωνο χρειάζεται την έγκριση 12 από τα 17 μέλη της ευρωζώνης προκειμένου να επικυρωθεί. Επομένως, οι ιρλανδοί ψηφοφόροι δεν μπορούν να «εκτροχιάσουν» αυτή τη νέα διακυβερνητική συνθήκη, αλλά μια πιθανή απόρριψή της θα υπονόμευε μια από τις πρωτοβουλίες-κλειδί της ΕΕ για την αντιμετώπιση της κρίσηςπηγή)

With the Irish referendum results not due until tomorrow, the story of the moment is the low turnout. The Guardian is saying «well below 50 percent».

Bruno in The Failygraph is saying that more than halfway through a 13-hour polling day yesterday, Συνέχεια

Shame on Europe for betraying Greece: Capitalism is triumphant as EU states sacrifice the Greek people in a desperate attempt to appease the gods of speculation


by for Critical Legal Thinking, part of the Guardian Comment Network guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 14 February 2012 11.41 GMT

‘We condemn Greece to misery and poverty to keep Standard & Poor’s off our backs. But we have miscalculated.’

Photograph: Argyropoulos/Sipa/Rex Features

The behaviour of the EU states towards Greece is inexplicable in the terms in which the EU defines itself. It is, first and foremost, a failure of solidarity.

The «austerity package», as the newspapers like to call it, seeks to impose on Greece terms that no people can accept. Even now the schools are running out of books. There were 40% cuts in the public health budget in 2010 – I can’t find the present figure. Greece’s EU «partners» are demanding a 32% cut Συνέχεια

Let Them Eat π


Yet another excellent article from Sturdyblog that steers away from the usual propagandist ranting of the media that is simply a tool in the hands of speculative bankers and other investor think tanks geared towards shaping public opinion to suit their needs.

The only regret I have when reading this gem is that punches were pulled. Papademos and Monti need to be seen as usurpers of democracy and their respective rise to power called coups d’état, plain and simple. Most important of all is the fact that people in Greece believe their country’s rising debt is not just 30-years’ worth of bad politics, corruption and inept members of Parliament — it’s been a methodical, calculated plan executed with preciseness, enabling the few to live off the many.

My firm belief is that this has been in the making for a long time. Greece practically hasn’t had a single patriot in office since WWII. Foreign interests influenced and still influence decisions to benefit everyone but us Greeks. Some saw the world as an orange, squeezing (half of it) as much as they could out of Third World countries — sorry, that would be developing countries to those who want politically correct euphemisms used to spice up slavery as an on-going evolutionary process towards development. Now that the orange is starting to shrivel, they’ve decided to pick up the other half by turning to Europe and as I foresee other developed countries and squeeze out the savings it managed to accumulate throughout the years.

Enjoy the read, and many thanks to the author for a very fine piece.

The Reaper

Let Them Eat π

Some months ago I tried to explain that the crisis in Greece concerned the entire globe directly and that what was happening to my country was nothing short of an economic coup d’état. Naturally, I was accused of doom-mongering and over-dramatising. It pains me to have been proven absolutely right on Συνέχεια

The Death of Democracy and National Sovereignty in Europe


As Johan Van Overtveldt, the editor-in-chef of Trends magazine states, Greece is «condemned to go down in a vicious circle of more recession, more unemployment, larger government deficits or budget deficits and so an endless need of additional money to fill up the gaps.»

So why continue the loans? Why continue the Euro sham? Since Italy is next, and France’s banking system will follow suit, why fix something that already smells putrid?

Brussels will undoubtedly push the situation to its advantage and demand to step in at any time. Συνέχεια

Why the media lies about Greece


by Jérôme E. Roos on June 24, 2011

In a short BBC interview today, I argued that the media’s witch hunt against Greece perpetuates a false impression that the Greeks themselves are to blame.

With special thanks to Naveena Kottoor, I was able to appear on BBC World Have Your Say today, for a brief segment on the international media’s coverage of the Greek debt crisis.

Asked whether I agreed that the international media are engaged in a ‘witch hunt’ against the Greek people, I pointed out that all talk about the Greeks being profligate, lazy and spoilt is simply not true (video below, my contribution from 34m50s onwards — somehow the audio got messed up):

 

Unfortunately, however, I didn’t get the time to back up these assertions with hard facts — so I would like this to use the opportunity to do so here.

Special thanks for the data below go out to Alex Andreou and Ingeborg Beugel.

MYTH #1: The Greeks are profligate Συνέχεια